GIS Map of Documentary Films

GIS Map of Documentary Films from Around the World

Mark Terry is a filmmaker, writer, teacher and PhD Candidate who has created an international collection of documentary films on a GIS Map. He has pinned feature-length, award-winning, social issue documentaries according to the cities, countries or regions in which they take place. Mark selected films which primarily represent these areas, visually, and culturally. The films also represent artistic excellence, having won major international awards and critical acclaim. Mark chose films from each area to represent, as much as possible due to availability, a temporal spectrum dating back to 1895. Not only does the map provide an overview of current issues, it also reveals the evolvement of the documentary film over the years which has benefitted from the affordances provided by new digital technology and methodology.

It is a remediated form of the documentary film which Mark calls a “Geo-Doc”: Geographic Information System maps being used on an overall comparative and documentary level, depicting the director’s vision of actual geographical locations around the world and the social issues affecting the people in these places. GIS maps prove to be an inventive way to zone in on the area of the world which most interests the viewer.

Click on a pin to view this GIS Map of Documentary Films representing each country.

GIS Map of Documentary Films

Along with international feature-length documentaries, you can also view another GIS map of documentary films made in much shorter formats. Students from around the world submitted three to five-minute film projects to the Youth Climate Report created by Mark Terry in conjunction with the United Nations Framework on Climate Change. Each year, students are given a choice of two subjects on which to focus, to help inform the world on issues affecting climate change, sustainability, pollution, water, and more.

Mark Terry wrote, produced and directed the documentary films, The Antarctica Challenge – A Global Warning and The Polar Explorer among other projects. See a list of his academic accomplishments at Ecotalkers.com, which includes papers and speeches on climate change and how Mark’s reimagining of GIS maps are an evolving form of the interactive documentary.

Data Delivery Systems using GIS Maps

Data Delivery Systems using GIS Maps is an innovative way to inform and educate the world about global climate change.

Geospatial information shared Data Delivery Systems using GIS Maps is a great way to communicate information using statistics, photographs, videos and more. Take, for example, Mark Terry’s Youth Climate Report published in conjunction with the United Nations Framework on Climate Change via a GIS map. This project focuses on the subjects of climate change, pollution solutions, water management, and inspiration as to the technology and innovations stemming from these areas, as well as the challenges. Every new pin plotted on the map helps develop this new form of interactive spatial and temporal documentary platform. It will continue to grow and be a source for comparative analysis as well as an excellent informational tool for both the world and UN policymakers regarding climate change and managing the earth.

This GIS map project, which was started in 2015, is open to participants from every continent. Submitted videos are juried by members of the UNFCC and Mark Terry to make sure they are of suitable quality and meet one of the two subjects that change each year. If you are interested in participating in next year’s competition, just look at the some the entries to get a feel for what innovative offerings the students are producing this growing GIS map.

Data Delivery Systems using GIS Maps

Click on each pin to see a different video.

See the winners of  the COP22 Youth Climate Video Competition, excellent examples of Data Delivery Systems using GIS Maps:

Also, watch the two videos produced by the winners of the 2017 Youth Climate Report Competition.

Watch the video by Faouzia Bahloul:
Watch the video by Phuong Vu Hoang